Tag Archives: Michael Gove

GCSE reforms: shrewd move or bad joke?

No government can feel satisfied with itself until it has “overhauled” the education system. This one is no different, but is it going in the right direction?

The education secretary, Michael Gove, has a plan for GCSEs meant to make Britain more competitive in the world and tackle ‘grade inflation’. The concern is that Britain’s education system is falling behind – the Chinese work harder, the Americans are more innovative, the Germans more logical and the Scandianvians are just better. And there have been more passes and higher grades every year that GCSEs have been taken since their invention in 1988.

So what’s going to change?

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Britain’s youth well-being in the harsh light of Unicef

©UNICEF/HQ04-0604/Giacomo Pirozzi - AZERBAIJAN: Children’s hands are raised high in front of a portion of the UNICEF logo painted on the side of a shipping container in the Galagayin settlement for internally displaced persons (IDPs), in the district of Sabirabad, 180 km south of Baku, the capital.

Naming and shaming: Britain got a report card this week from Unicef on the well-being of its younger generation. The result? An award for improvement. And a beating, because Britain’s kids still don’t know nuffink (like not starting a sentence with a conjunction).

Unicef (the United Nations Children’s Fund) measured several factors related to well-being and scored 29 rich countries for their performance in each category. (Full report here).

So what’s the damage to dear old Blighty?

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